Sheet Pan Sausage and Veggies

Hi guys! We are all settled in to our new apartment in the Navy Yard area of D.C.–and I’m loving it so far! Our neighborhood is nicely walkable (even in this heat!) and really close to other fun neighborhoods like Capitol Hill and Eastern Market. Plus, our building has a pool, so I’ve been spending a little time up there, feeling like I’m on a true vacation (rather than technically unemployed).

Brown like Bey
#goals

Rooftop pool aside, I *love* my new kitchen. We’ve got almost double the counter space compared to our St. Louis apartment.

activities
me, every time I walk into the kitchen

I’m excited to start trying a bunch of new recipes and old favorites, but unpacking, applying for jobs, and exploring the new location has left me pooped most nights. The recipe I’m sharing today (based on this one) is a *lifesaver* for those days when you’re just too tired to get creative in the kitchen. All you have to do is chop up some veggies and sausage, toss it all with olive oil and spices, and pop it in the oven for a half hour. Presto, easy peasy, delicious dinner!

Sheet Pan Sausage and Veggies

Ingredients:

  • about 8 small potatoes, cut into small cubes (I used small white, red, and purple potatoes)
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into squares
  • a handful of green beans (sorry it’s not more scientific, I literally grabbed a hearty handful from the bag)
  • 1 medium head of broccoli, cut into florets
  • 2 andouille sausage links, sliced into thick coins
  • 6 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 Tbs oregano
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • Pinch red pepper flakes (up to 1/4 tsp if you prefer more heat)
  1. Preheat the oven to 400ΒΊF
  2. Wash and prep the veggies and sausage. Cover baking sheet in foil and spray with cooking oil.
  3. Spread prepped veggies and sausage on the baking sheet in a thin layer.
  4. Whisk the olive oil with the spices, then drizzle over the veggies and sausage. Toss gently to thoroughly coat.
  5. Roast 30 minutes, stirring/tossing once about halfway through.

Notes: We enjoyed them over spiced rice (rice seasoned with a dash of ginger, turmeric, and season salt). This could be just as good on its own, or over a bed of quinoa, barley, or other grain of choice.
You can use any veggies you prefer–asparagus would probably be really good, a little onion, maybe some spinach added immediately after removing to wilt it just a bit.
The original recipe suggested garnishing with Parmesan cheese, which I *so* wish I’d remembered to do–it was amazing without it, but come on, everything is better with cheese!
This also reheated really well the next day–I popped a plate in the microwave for a minute, which was all it needed to warm through. The sausage was a *little* dry, but not inedibly so.

Enjoy! Let me know in the comments if you give this recipe a try πŸ™‚

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Salty Meatballs

It sounds inappropriate, but it’s what I just told the head of security at my office I was going to eat. Which yes, was inappropriate, but I did not mean to say it out loud. I meant to just say lunch. This is why I try not to interact with people.

Following this Pinterest recipe kick, I decided to make Salisbury Steak Meatballs last night. I went to the grocery store without my husband, which (depending on how you look at it) was a huge mistake. I got everything on my list…and then a bunch of snacks (because 2/$3 cracker snack packs was a great deal…and because I was freaking hungry, man!).

I got home and got ready to make this tasty-looking dish, only to remember I didn’t get potatoes to mash for a side. I kind of did that on purpose ’cause I wasn’t really feeling like cooking potatoes, but I still felt all “aw, man” when I realized I’d want some sort of starch. My husband was not feeling great (and has had horrendous experience with ground beef in the past) so he opted for a rice-and-Chick’n nugget-burrito instead. Therefore, I made him cook extra rice. Problem solved.

The meatballs turned out pretty spectacular. Side question: why is meatloaf pretty gross, but tiny meatballs made with condiments and spices are not? My best guess is because tiny food is always awesome (it’s adorable and you can justify eating a TON). Basically, it’s science.

Anyhoo, I turned to making the gravy only to realize I don’t have any cornstarch. I feel like that’s a lie because I really hate cornstarch, therefore I’m super aware that it’s in my cupboard. It’s weird to me that something powdery can create such friction on your fingers when rubbed together, and now I’m giving myself a minor seizure just thinking about how to describe it SO needless to say, I know about cornstarch. It sits with my baking stuff and laughs at me when I need it for cookies or whatever. I get a weird burst of triumph when I throw out a box. I think I would have remembered such an occasion.

Sadly, I couldn’t find it. I suspect my husband went on one of his raids to throw out all the expired food in our home and tossed it, which is rude because he stole my moment and also didn’t let me know I had to buy more of the stupid stuff.

I could have asked the Google for other suggestions to thicken up gravy, but I decided to just add a cup or so of water to the recipe and toss in a heaping handful of egg noodles. Because they make starchy water, right? It kind of worked, too. It was pretty thin gravy, but still a decent sauce so I’m counting it as a win.

Where I went wrong: I told my husband I didn’t need anything in the dishwasher before he ran it. I knew things like measuring cups/spoons were in there, but I was feeling superior about my eye-balling skills (especially after that fantastic soup turned out so well). Word to the wise: DO NOT TRY TO EYEBALL 1/4 TSP OF SALT. Or 1 tbs of Worcestershire Sauce. Especially if you are the type to err on the “little more than necessary” side like me. Because I way overdid it on salt and sauce and it made everything a bit salty. This is coming from a gal who loves salt. Pretty much anything “salted” is better than not. Still, I was chugging water with this dish.

Otherwise, the meatballs were tender and juicy and delicious, and the noodles were a nice (ingenious — if I do say so myself) addition. Again, the recipe I butchered can be found here. I would highly recommend trying it out — just be sure to measure that salt appropriately! πŸ˜‰

 

P.S.: In case you were concerned about a minor plot point — My husband way overdid it on the rice. I was a sport and ate a bowl of straight up rice (partially to neutralize all the salt) but there was still so. much. left. I now know to be more specific when asking him to cook “extra” rice.