Reflections on Virginia, and Life in General

Today my husband and I leave for Missouri (thank goodness for the option to schedule future posts!). As of writing this, I have two full days left in Virginia. Other than the first five or six years of my life, Virginia has always been home. I went to school here. I made lasting friendships with some beautiful, garbage people. I fell in love and found my forever person here. Despite being born in Maryland, Virginia will always be the best part of the D.C. metro area, and Maryland will always suck simply because it isn’t Virginia.

My excitement for the adventure my husband and I are about to embark on has far outweighed any nerves or sadness up until now. Maybe I was tucking all the fear and grief and anxiety into a box as easily as I packed our apartment. Cocooned in bubblewrap and triple-taped so it can’t burst free until I’m ready to unpack it all. Maybe it didn’t feel real, until I found myself surrounded by boxes and drinking water from a solo cup. Regardless, I’ve been able to avoid the harder feelings, but now that the move is here, so are they.

Don’t get me wrong; I am excited. A move like this, to a place that feels random, seems so right. It’s healthy. Adulting. From here, we could go anywhere. And now is the best time, before we are entrenched in careers and surrounded by babies.

But I keep thinking about my college graduation. In a way, this is similar. A huge life change, full of unknowns and fears that friendships will look different when we no longer all live within 5 minutes of each other. At a party just before graduation, one friend — who I met early on freshman year — took my hand and said “we’ve been friends for FOUR YEARS! That’s so long! I’ve known you longer than most of the people here!” It seemed so epic, and at that time in my life, it was. When I said goodbye to that same friend earlier this week, I felt that same teary nostalgia. I’ve known you longer than most of our friends.

It’s hard saying goodbye to that — in some ways, harder even than leaving my family. I know my mom will drop everything to talk to me whenever I call her, because she’s my mom and that’s what moms do. The dynamics of my family relationships won’t change so drastically. Friends have lives that take precedence. They’ll have babies and buy houses and get married, and my part in their immediate lives will diminish. It won’t be as simple as sending out a group text asking who’s around to hang out this weekend. We’ll have to plan time and take off work and buy plane tickets. Still, I know they’ll be there when I need them, just like I’ll be there for them.

I’ll also miss Virginia. I know on the trips I’ve taken to Missouri, I’ve thought it looks fairly similar, but I’ll miss walking along the Potomac River in Old Town Alexandria, or watching the planes take off and land from Gravelly Point, or easy “hikes” along Skyline Drive or Great Falls Park. It’s been nice to go back to JMU for Rocktown Beer and Music Festivals or for Homecoming or just to reminisce. Even though we rarely took advantage, having D.C. so close has always been a tantalizing option for food or sports or fun.

So even though I’m truly looking forward to the adventure of discovering a new place — even though I have dozens of things to do already listed — it’s hard leaving this beautiful state that’s been my home in every sense of the word for nearly my entire life.

Advertisements

Jesus was all about wine and so am I

Okay, so the Bible never really specifies whether Jesus drank the miracle wine he created but either way, he knew how to keep a party going so I raise my glass to him.

Virginia is pretty well known for its vineyards. Isn’t it? Maybe I only think that because I live in Virginia and can visit any number of them in a 45-minute drive. But I feel like Loudoun County wines are a thing.

My husband and I have visited quite a few of said Virginia wineries (side question that does not need to be answered: what’s the difference between winery and vineyard? I think something to do with grapes grown on site versus shipped in — which sounds like that is technically cheating, but what do I know).

His favorite (until recently) was Stone Tower. It is a gorgeous vineyard with rolling hills and a pond and a separate barn for kids and pets so people can bring their family OR people can enjoy adulthood without screaming kids and slobbering dogs. Choices. There’s a huge patio overlooking a second patio (which is usually closed — at least when we’ve been — for a wedding), and tons of seating that is always almost all taken.

13557818_10154391057803939_2078348678929137859_n

This vineyard is lovely and well worth a visit, but it is crowded and if it’s a weekend in the summer, there’s a wedding closing down part of the grounds. This is why — after the third or fourth visit — even my husband admitted defeat and agreed we could go elsewhere (after waiting 20 minutes in line for a bottle of wine that is decent but…I’ll just say we go for the scenery).

18556144_10155433971548939_1227506905980397777_n
Stone Tower does lend itself to some pretty great photo backdrops

My favorite is Paradise Springs in Clifton. Part of this is because we can’t go to Paradise Springs without also stopping in the town for some ah-mazing crepes at the Clifton Cafe. I think the wine is pretty good here, too, but full disclaimer: I’ve only recently begun to develop any sort of “palate” for good wine vs. less good. Wine is wine, amiright? No, I know I’m wrong. I guess I’ll just need to keep up the wine tastings until I’m able to discern between the complexities of a merlot and the subtleties of a chardonnay (or even if those descriptions could even apply to those wines. I’m hopeless!).

11037022_10100935611149561_8819231932104429687_n
So excited for Paradise Springs! (Photo stolen from my sister’s Instagram)

I’m still trying to find my husband a new favorite vineyard near here, but since visiting Sonoma on a spur of the moment trip last time we were in California, he’s become something of a California wine snob. Still, we have a date this afternoon to visit Quattro Gumba, so fingers crossed!

Now, Missouri isn’t known for its wines, but apparently there’s a Missouri wine country very similar to Loudoun County and not too far outside Saint Louis, so we can keep exploring and improving our wine palates even after the move.