My Favorite Recipe

In preparing for our big move, I’ve had to really think about our meals this week. Half our kitchen is already packed and the rest is either in the dishwasher currently or waiting for my husband to use (like the coffee maker he’s used exactly twice since purchasing with our wedding Crate&Barrel giftcard at the beginning of the year). I’m not bitter. Just impatient. Movers will be here in 4 days and rather than just letting me pack it and continue to purchase his iced coffee elsewhere, he insists he’ll want to brew coffee….

I digress. My husband’s packing style and the frustrations it causes me could have its own post. This is supposed to be about the meal I’ve discovered can be made super-lazy-substitute-style and is delicious and also cleans up SO easily because it’s one pan (okay, two including the rice).

I used to be wary of Indian food. The first time I tried any, we had a local Indian restaurant sponsor an open house at the apartment community where I worked. One resident told me her son loved their Butter Chicken, so I tasted some — and went back for like fourths. It blew my mind and made me sad that I hadn’t been more adventurous in my food choices until then (Since, I’ve discovered I also love Thai and Ethiopian food, so hooray!). I found a recipe to make Butter Chicken at home and realized that other than garam masala, I had all the spices I needed already. That recipe can be found here and I highly highly highly recommend it. It’s my favorite thing I know how to cook. Because my husband is paranoid of things like salmonella, I stir-fry the chicken until cooked before adding it into the sauce, but otherwise follow the recipe to a T (including cooking the chicken more in the sauce. Between the olive oil I saute the chicken in and the sauce, the chunks stay super moist — and I hate myself for that word choice).

One night I was craving the sauce, but we had no chicken and no desire to go to the store. I subbed in chickpeas and even my husband loved it. More recently, since my immersion blender has been packed, I used a can of tomato sauce in place of diced tomatoes. Ultimately, I prefer the more authentic pureed texture, but in a pinch — or if you’re feeling lazy — very little is sacrificed in terms of taste by using sauce over tomatoes.

Below is the recipe I used last night, scrounged together with what I had on hand. It turned out better than any other time before, so it’s probably what I’ll follow going forward, especially if chickpeas are involved.


Butter Chickpeas:

Ingredients:
1 can of chickpeas/garbanzo beans
1 Tbs lemon juice
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 Tbs garam masala
1/2 tsp kosher salt

1 Tbs olive oil
1 Tbs minced onion
1 Tbs garam masala
1 Tbs paprika
generous pinch cinnamon
1 tsp salt
1 can tomato sauce
1/2 cup milk (I use Lactaid 2%)
2 Tbs butter

  1. Combine first section of ingredients in ziplock bag and shake/mix until chickpeas are coated evenly with spices.
  2. In large skillet, heat olive oil over Medium. Add spices (onion through salt) and cook 1 minute, stirring frequently.
  3. Stir in tomato sauce until spices dispersed throughout. Cook 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Stir in milk until dispersed throughout.
  5. Add chickpeas. Cook, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes (I cook until 2 cups of instant rice seasoned with turmeric is ready).

It’s excellent over rice. That’s all I’ve tried, but I bet it would be good on its own or over potatoes, maybe? Also: the first jar of garam masala I bought was Archer Farms brand (Target) and it was delicious and mild. When it ran out, I bought a bag of the stuff from Wegmans (Laxmi Brand) and whooooo does it have some heat. Fortunately, my husband and I like spicy food. Still, if — like me — you don’t have much experience with Indian spices and would be purchasing garam masala for the first time, especially if you prefer little to no heat, I’d recommend heading to Target for the spice. Those are the only two brands I’ve tried, so I can’t make personal recommendations beyond them.

This dish also reheats really well, so I’ll get to enjoy the leftovers while my husband is out with his buddies tonight (and maybe sneak the coffee maker into a box while I’m at it).

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Uh-Oh, Spaghettios

I forgot that used to be a thing, until someone showed me a joke:

her: “I’m breaking up with you.”

him: “Is it because I keep saying ‘uh oh, spaghettios’?”

her: “Actually, yes.”

him: “Uh oh, spaghettios…”

Now it keeps popping into my head. Which leads me to think about — what else? — spaghettios. I love spaghettios almost as much as Kraft mac n cheese or hot dogs. It’s so easy to pop open a can and have that cheesy-tomato goodness in my belly in a matter of minutes. But I am an adult now, and therefore I must limit my lazy junk food splurges to desperate times (like when I’m really needing quick comfort food, or at the beach with my garbage friends). The good news is there are plenty of “adult” (read: homemade) versions of the comfort food I so enjoy. I’m still searching for the *perfect* macaroni and cheese recipe, but I’ve found enough good ones that I can whip up a decent pot when the craving strikes. I save the hot dogs for the ballpark (or a particularly fantastic grilling day). That leaves spaghettios as my only semi-justifiable lazy-splurge.


Until recently.

I stumbled across the original recipe on Pinterest (I am obsessed with Pinterest recipes), but you can find it here. I can never thank Nikki Gladd enough for the post that gave me permission to eat spaghettios like an adult. I’ve made my own tweaks and adjustments, which to me give the dish even more of an authentic taste, still while maintaining an air of healthiness.

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The recipe says use a saucepan, but as you can see, any pan will do in a pinch!

The most important item: spaghetti rings. I found them at Wegmans (which is hands down the best grocery store.)

I skip the garlic. I’m a big fan of garlic, but I’ve found eliminating it from this particular dish actually makes it better (which is rarely the case). The other major trick I found is cooking the noodles directly in the sauce, rather than separately and combining with the sauce at the end. The starch from the pasta thickens the sauce and the tomatoey-taste fattens the pasta.

Check out the full recipe if you’re feeling like reconnecting with the kid inside you (or if, like me, you feel a little guilty for all the canned junk you eat).

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Homemade Spaghettios:

  • Olive Oil for pan (~1 tbs)
  • 1/4 tsp Red Pepper Flakes
  • 1 can Tomato Sauce
  • 1 scoop Tomato Paste (~1 tbs. The time I made this the best, I used a regular spoon and eyeballed it)
  • 3 cups water
  • 8 oz spaghetti rings (or other round pasta)
  • Generous pinch of granulated sugar
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
  • 2-4 tbs butter (you can cut down to make it even ‘healthier’)
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • ~1 cup shredded cheese (I used pre-shredded Mexican cheese. I also just dropped two handfuls in rather than measuring an actual cup)
  1. In medium saucepan, saute the red pepper flakes in olive oil over Medium heat for about 30 seconds.
  2. Add the tomato sauce, paste, water, pasta, sugar, salt and pepper.
  3. Bring to low boil, stirring frequently to keep pasta from sticking to bottom of pan.
  4. Add butter. Stir until melted.
  5. Stir in milk.
  6. Simmer over Medium-Low for about 10 minutes or until pasta is cooked.
  7. (If sauce seems too runny, add a second scoop of tomato paste to thicken. Stir until fully distributed, then turn off heat) Add cheese one handful at a time, stirring between to melt fully.
  8. Enjoy!

This recipe makes about 4 servings.

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Whiskey Mushroom Risotto *Updated with Photos*

Guys, last night, I made something pretty fantastic. I did not take any pictures because I wasn’t sure it would turn out well (and then once we knew it turned out well, we were too busy scarfing it down to pause for artistry). I promise to update this with pics the next time I make the dish — which will probably be pretty soon since my husband loves Mushroom Risotto.

Usually when we make risotto, I saute the mushrooms in red wine and butter the way my mama taught me (with a nice large glass for myself, of course). Last night, we were out of Red. I had an opened bottle of White I usually use in soups and such, but it struck me that we have a full liquor cabinet that gets almost no cooking love from us at all. I made the off-handed suggestion of trying whiskey in place of wine, to which my husband enthusiastically agreed. He set about stirring that risotto like a champion, and I tasted my options and settled on Eagle Rare for this dish.

There’s only the barest hint of grains on the tail end of the dish, enough to notice but not enough to overwhelm. The whiskey mixes deliciously with a pinch of thyme and the melted butter, and gets absorbed at the last minute by the fat risotto grains. Even if you don’t like drinking whiskey (I personally am not a fan), give this dish a try!

Whiskey Mushroom Risotto – serves 4

1 tbs Olive Oil
1 cup Arborio Rice (Risotto)
3 cups Chicken Broth
2 tbs butter
2 shots of whiskey (I used Eagle Rare, but a cheaper brand would probably work just as well)
1 package Sliced White Mushrooms
1 tsp Dried Thyme
Pinch of Kosher Salt and Fresh-Cracked Pepper

  1. Heat olive oil in sauce pan over Medium. Add the risotto and saute ~2 minutes, until they start to turn golden.
  2. Add 1 cup of broth, stirring constantly until all absorbed. Add another cup of broth. Continue until all broth has been absorbed.
  3. Meanwhile, melt butter in saute pan over slightly more than Medium (but not quite Medium-High).
  4. Add whiskey and mushrooms. Toss to coat.
  5. Saute 3-4 minutes, until mushrooms start to soften.
  6. Add thyme, salt and pepper. Continue sauteing until mushrooms are soft and brown, ~3-4 more minutes.
  7. Pour mushrooms and remaining sauce over the risotto. Stir until liquid mostly absorbed. Can garnish with a sprinkle of freshly-grated Parmesan cheese and sprig of fresh thyme.

*NOTE: If you can get yourself a risotto-stirrer, it makes everything so much easier. In the past, my husband and I have traded off turns stirring, but this time he did it the entire time like some sort of Herculean hero, and it was amazing. For me. He complained of a sore arm, but I was too busy enjoying our culinary masterpiece to pay attention.

My risotto stirrer hard at work

I should probably learn how to plate better